Data Users Conference

Vehicle Access Challenges

In Nebraska there are tens of thousands of residents who do not have access to a vehicle. Due to preference, financial limitations, disability, or other reasons, they do not have a personal vehicle to transport them to their destination. Many households with access to a single vehicle also have more than one member, thus limiting mobility for the family unit. In some cases, these vehicles are not functioning or are too expensive for the household to maintain, thus, that while they have a single vehicle that does not guarantee they have access to use it on a regular basis.

View Vehicle Access Challenges in Nebraska, February 2018

Assessment of Intercity Bus Services in Nebraska

The Federal Transit Administration defines intercity bus service as regularly scheduled bus service for the general public that operates with limited stops over fixed routes connecting two or more urban areas not in close proximity, that has the capacity for transporting baggage carried by passengers and that makes meaningful connections with scheduled intercity bus service to more distance points, if such service is available. In rural states like Nebraska, intercity bus service is most often used to connect rural areas with larger urbanized areas.

View Assessment of Intercity Bus Services in Nebraska, July 2017

View Assessment of Intercity Bus Services in Nebraska, July 2014

Rural Transit: UNO Policy Brief for the Nebraska Legislature

Rural Nebraska is served by a variety of transportation services, including rural public transit, intercity bus service, Amtrak, and air service, as well as private vehicles. Despite this, many rural Nebraskans have no or limited access to transportation services. This report looks at some aspects of rural transit in Nebraska.

View Rural Transit, November 2014

Mobility Management: Empirical Evidence of Fiscal Benefits from Multiple States

Mobility management can be defined as a strategic approach to transportation service coordination that improves efficiencies and increases transportation options to meet the needs of the public. What follows are examples of the benefits derived from successfully implemented mobility management projects.

View Mobility Management: Empirical Evidence of Fiscal Benefits from Multiple States

For questions about research on rural public transit contact the UNO Center for Public Affairs Research:

Josie Schafer, Director
jgschafer@unomaha.edu
402-554-2134